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Build Your Horses Up; Don't Break Them Down

Amber McGee

Build Your Horses Up; Don't Break Them Down

This is the face of a very worried and fearful horse. He's allowing me into positions that make him feel very vulnerable and he isn't confident that my intentions are where I say they are.

If you look at a face like this and think this is a horse that needs to be roped, chased, forced or man handled then you've missed something. This is the face of a very worried and fearful horse. He's allowing me into positions that make him feel very vulnerable and he isn't confident that my intentions are where I say they are. He came off pretty confident when I first met him, but he was confident with his ability to avoid being handled and intimidate. Now that he understands I'm not going anywhere and will only accept a good solid try on his part, he is showing just how worried he really is. You CAN teach horses without force or intimidation. You CAN get through to them with kindness, persistence and the ability to know when to ask for more and when to reward a try. It's not always rainbows and butterflies, but it isn't always a pissing match of who's in charge either.It's OK to take the time to build some confidence and show them they can be with you, while being heard and having their emotions taken into consideration. We shouldn't attempt to force them into a box they aren't ready to be in. Build your horse up, don't break him down.